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"The Hum Line" , an amazing line, some info on the players below. taken from detroitredwings.com

Bruce MacGregor 1966-67

The Canadian Prairies pumped many a great player into Detroit. Gordie Howe, Sid Abel, (Black) Jack Stewart, Norm Ullman and Terry Sawchuk all traveled this pipeline to Hockeytown and so did Bruce MacGregor.

"Going back to the days when Detroit had a (WHL) farm club in Edmonton, when you came up from junior, you were basically a Red Wing," said MacGregor, who signed with Detroit in 1960, launching a 673-game stint with the team.

He was just 19 when making his debut with the club during the 1960-61 season. "I didn’t see a lot of ice time," said MacGregor, who garnered one assist in 12 games. "It was a big step, one year out of junior."

A step he made permanently the following season, never again playing a game in the minor leagues, establishing a reputation as a player who was willing to do the dirty work along the boards and in the corners.

"My style was to play and play hard," MacGregor said. "I took checks and I gave checks. I didn’t mind going into the corners. I wasn’t going to try and beat people up, but I didn’t shy away from the physical play."

His best season as a Red Wing came in 1966-67, when MacGregor led the club with 28 goals while playing right wing on the "HUM Line" with center Norm Ullman and left-winger Paul Henderson.

"That was the biggest of my NHL thrills, the opportunity to play on a line with Norm Ullman and Paul Henderson," MacGregor said. "We were friends and our wives were good friends. We got along and I think that’s part of the reason why we worked so well together."

Three times, he produced 20-goal seasons working with that unit, reaching career highs with 28 goals and 47 points in 1966-67.

The unit was broken up the following spring when Ullman and Henderson were traded to Toronto and MacGregor never again scaled such offensive heights.

"When that happened, it was a tough blow," MacGregor said of the deal. "I just never got back on my feet in Detroit."

MacGregor was traded to the New York Rangers by new GM Ned Harkness in 1970. "We had such good leadership with Sid Abel," MacGregor said. "Sid treated everyone well and he really cared about the players. When he left, those things started to change."

MacGregor jumped to the Edmonton Oilers when they were a WHA team in 1973 and stayed with that organization after his playing days, working in the front office until his retirement following the 1999-2000 season.

BORN:
Edmonton, Alberta, April 26, 1941

ACQUIRED:
Signed to pro contract, September 1, 1960

BEST SEASON WITH RED WINGS:
1966-67 (28-19-47)

TOTALS WITH RED WINGS:
GP-673, G-151, A-184, PTS-335

HONORS:
Led team in goals, 1966-67
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Norm Ullman 1961-62

Norm Ullman, it seemed, had everything going for him except good timing.

The slick, playmaking center arrived in Detroit in 1955-56, the year after Detroit’s Stanley Cup win. In 1967-68, his Detroit days ended when the Wings dealt him to Toronto, one season after the most recent Cup win by the Maple Leafs.

Ullman skated in the NHL for two decades without winning the Stanley Cup, but it is the only item missing from his impressive resume. He posted 20 goals in 16 of his 20 NHL seasons, leading the league with 42 goals in 1964-65 after a taking a tip from linemate Gordie Howe to increase his shooting.

"Normie always tried to move past one too many men, so he could make the perfect pass," Howe said. "Once he started to shoot, he started scoring more goals."

So quiet was Ullman that teammates often lost track of him off the ice. "You’d ask, ‘Is Normie around?’" teammate Johnny Wilson recalled, "‘And someone would say, ‘Yeah, he’s sitting next to you.’"

Finding him on the ice was never a problem. Seven times, Ullman finished among the NHL’s top 10 scorers, including a second-place finish in 1964-65, when he registered a career-high 83 points. Chicago center Stan Mikita won the scoring title, but Ullman was named pivot on the First All-Star Team, one of two times he earned NHL All-Star recognition.

Ullman employed his skating speed as an effective weapon. "He was the greatest forechecker in hockey," noted New York Rangers coach Emile Francis. That fierce forechecking helped him produce a Detroit playoff record two goals in five seconds in an April 11, 1965 game with Chicago. Ullman was Chicago’s personal nightmare in post-season play. He collected two hat-tricks and 13 points versus the Blackhawks in the 1964 semifinals and had a pair of five-point games against them in Stanley Cup play - on April 7, 1963 and again on April 7, 1964.

Ullman finished third in NHL scoring with 70 points in 1966-67, but was dealt to Toronto in a seven-player trade the following season in which Detroit landed Frank Mahovlich.

He toiled for the Leafs through the 1974-75 season and spent two years with Edmonton of the WHA before retiring in 1977.

The Hockey Hall of Fame welcomed Ullman as a member in 1982.

BORN:
Edmonton, Alberta, December 26, 1935

ACQUIRED:
Signed to pro contract, March 19, 1954

BEST SEASON WITH RED WINGS:
1964-65 (42-41-83)

TOTALS WITH RED WINGS: GP-875, G-324, A-434, PTS-758

HONORS:
Selected to NHL First All-Star Team, 1964-65; Selected to NHL Second All-Star Team, 1966-67; Played in eight NHL All-Star Games; Elected to Hockey Hall of Fame, 1982
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Henderson played 13 seasons in the NHL. He began his career in 1962 with the Detroit Red Wings, staying there until 1968 (with the exception of the 1963 season, when he played for the Pittsburgh Hornets of the AHL). He was traded by Detroit with Norm Ullman and Floyd Smith to the Toronto Maple Leafs for Frank Mahovlich, Gary Unger, Pete Sternowski and the contract rights to Carl Brewer on March 3rd, 1968.

He was among the NHL players selected to compete against the USSR in the 1972 Summit Series. He became famous in Canada after scoring the winning goals in the final three games of the eight-game series, securing the Canadian victory.

In 1974 Henderson left the Maple Leafs and the NHL altogether, jumping ship to the rival WHA, where he played for the Toronto Toros. He remained with the Toros franchise after its relocation to Birmingham to become the Bulls, and remained with the Bulls after they transferred to the CHL in 1979.

Interestingly, he also played for Canada in the 1974 Summit Series, in which Canadian WHA players were pitted against the Soviet team.

He returned to the NHL in 1980 for one final season, playing for the Atlanta Flames. The following season he returned to the CHL's Bulls and retired in 1981.

Henderson remains best known for scoring the winning goals in the sixth, seventh and eighth (deciding) games of the 1972 Summit Series.


Awards
Led the Ontario Hockey Association Junior "A" League in goals in 1963 (49)
Played in the 1972 NHL All-Star Game
Played in the 1973 NHL All-Star Game

Records
Most game-winning goals in 1972 Summit Series (3; record was held by Vladimir Vikulov (2), prior to Game 8)
Most consecutive game-winning goals in 1972 Summit Series (3; record was held by Vladimir Vikulov (2), prior to Game 8)
Most goals in 1972 Summit Series (7, tied with Phil Esposito and Alex Yakushev)
One of two players (the other being Frank Mahovlich), to have played for Canada in the 1972 Summit Series and 1974 Summit Series
 
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OLYMPIA STADIUM said:
Here is a nice photo taken at olympia stadium of the HUM line.Bruce MacGgregor, Norm Ullman and Paul Henderson.
Paul Henderson wasn't my favourite... he was only good on Team Canada when I used to watch him play in the late 60s and early 70s. He was my dad's favourite player though. Norm Ullman was a good defensive forward. My dad always said "Defense is more important than offence."

My favourite line of all time is from my favourite team of all time in the 81-82 Islanders. Mike Bossy-Bryan Trottier-and John Tonelli. They were all great players. Mike Bossy would rack up huge goals with his wicked shot for his time and Trottier would assist and make plays. Tonelli was an all around forward. I think Bossy in my opinion was better than Gretzky. Gretzky just had a way too good team with a lot of superstars on it. The Islanders were very good as well but Bossy demonstrated more effort. I can name lots of players from the 50s and 60s who are better than Gretzky to go off topic with my statement.

Another line I really enjoyed was the 1974-1975 Philadelphis Broad Street Bully first line with Bobby Clarke, Rick MacLeish, and Reggie Leach line. I'm not sure if that was the exact line due to my bad memory. I think Bill Barber might have been on that line. When Rick MacLeish was injured in late 1975 I liked the 1975-1976 Flyer first line with Clarke-Leach-and Barber.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
hmm i have read about those. they were way outta my time. sometimes i wish i were here to have seen some of the old time hockey ....

One of my favorite Modern lines would have been the Grind Line, Mac, Drapes, and Malts. A great combination and very key group in the games they played together.

They had alot of bumping and grinding. Drapes did alot of the scoring. Mac was a contributor by dropping the gloves when needed, Malts was the middle man, meaning he was a good set up man and didnt take anyones crap. still doesnt. but boy was that a great line!!!!
 

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L-c-b Line Philadelphia

The philadelphia line that masterhockey was talking about was the L-C-B line.which had bobby clarke,reggie leach and bill barber.rick macleish was never part of the L-C-B line.this line was a big reason that philadelphia won 2 cups in the 1970s. they also lost the stanley cup to montreal in 1976 with reggie leach getting the MVP in the playoffs for the losing team just like what happend to roger crozier for the red wings in 1966.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks. Hope to learn more from you and everyone else about hockey histoyr
 

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Montreal's Punch Line: Toe Blake-Elmer Lach-Maurice "Rocket" Richard. Finished 1-2-3 in scoring in 1944-45.

Buffalo's French Connection: Richard Martin-Gilbert Perreault-Rene Robert. Led the Sabres to the Stanley Cup finals in 1975.

Montreal's Guy Lafleur-Jacques Lemaire-Steve Shutt. They won 18 Stanley Cups among them.

1980s L.A.'s Triple Crown Line: Dave Taylor-Marcel Dionne-Charlie Simmer. Each member had more than 100 points in 1980-81.

2000s Vancouver Canucks: Todd Bertuzzi, Brendan Morisson, Markus Naslund one of the best line i see play in person.

2000s Colorado Avalanches: Milan Hedjuk, Peter Fosberg, Alex Tanguay.

and finally Mario Lemieux, Wayne Gretzky, Mark Messier from cup Cananda 87
 

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drtuad said:
2000s Colorado Avalanches: Milan Hedjuk, Peter Fosberg, Alex Tanguay.
:D Yeah, I'm so biased....
 

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welll im a massive leaf fan but i would say my favorite line of all time is not the kid line (charlie conacher,Joe Primeau, and of course harvey jackson but the KRAUT line :thumbsup: :thumbsup: They were amzing Bobby Baun Milt Schmidt and Woody Dumart. The neat thing about these kitchener boys is that they played tog there in there boy hood
 

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Not a Canucks fan at all but for some reason i really like the line this year that i saw, Naslund and the Sedins. Its just awesome, I think it would be AMAZING to have your brother and a super star on the same line as you.
 

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Tis' the Season

Rick Jeanneret's famous "Tis' the season" call:
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:: BUFFALO SABRES ::

The one right below "Classic Jeanneret Calls"

"...Oh tis the season, Fa-La-La-La-La-La-Fontaine..."
 

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im not really positive why, but one line that always stands out in my memory, is from the 2002 world juniors for team canada. i personally loved the line of jared aulin, mike cammalleri and brad boyes!

i also really liked the BBC line in carolina
Brind'Amour-Battaglia-Cole
 

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The Three Dan line the Flyers iced a few years back.Dan Lacroix,Dan Kordic,aand Scott Daniels.

'If ya can't beat 'em on the ice,beat 'em into the ice'.

Go Hershey.Need another Calder this year.
 

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Looks like Lemaire-Shutt-Lafleur line will win this survey

Here's another vote for the Jacques Lemaire-Steve Shutt-
Guy Lafleur line---looks like they're a winner. What a line
it was.

Among players I never got to see, the Howie Morenz-Aurel
Joliat-Johnny Gagnon line gets my nod.
 

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Jagr/Lemieux/Francis. Didn't Trottier, Bossy, and Gillies play on the same line? If not, that one's still one of the best due to Trottier and Bossy alone. Fedorov, Shanahan, and Yzerman I think played on the same line for the Wings' Cup wins in '97 and '98, too.
 
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