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There is a debate going on in the Doan thread. I thought this might bring about a good debate on the subject, in the proper forum.

My wife and I recognise that knowing both English and French is a benifit to living in this Country. So we decided long ago to send our children to an all french school in Niagara Falls. Now I can't speak much french, what I speak is something called Frenglish, and I have to rely on wife to translate. Looking back, I wish I had paid more attention in french class.

People need to realise that knowing both languages opens up a whole bunch of doors for you, and this is why we send our children to an all french school. They learn english at home, and the school slowly introduces english studies at around grade 5. They will go to a half and half for high school.

So IMO instead of saying "I'm English, screw you" Or "Baisez-vous, je suis français" both should embrace each cultures and languages and reap the benifits of doing so.
 

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I completley agree. I am in french immersion, and neither of my parents speak french, except my dad, he speaks Frenglish, and so when I need help with homework I go to my sister cousins and aunt (who are all from Montreal, well live there anyway.)

Canada is definatley bi-lingual, and it's a great thing. I find it great that is a worth a few points if you want to immigrate here, I would like to see it more, but then again, it's not the base language of Canada.

Is Canada Bi-Lingual? Absolutley.
 

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Yes, I'd say it is, I can speek french.

But I'd agree theres more we can do, for example making it manditory to know both French and English.
 

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It's as bilingual as the US is with Spanish and English. I don't have much moe to add to the conversaion otehr than i think that my hgih school French clases will eventually hekp me out. An d ig you didn't knoe aldready, I'm slightly inebrited/
 

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Spanish is not an offical language, French is, Spanish speaking people were not co-founding fathers of your nation, the French were.

One third of your population does not speak Spanish living within their own distinct culture and recognized as such, the French here do.

There are huge differences between the Spanish scenario in the US and the French one in Canada.
 

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There is a debate going on in the Doan thread. I thought this might bring about a good debate on the subject, in the proper forum.

My wife and I recognise that knowing both English and French is a benifit to living in this Country. So we decided long ago to send our children to an all french school in Niagara Falls. Now I can't speak much french, what I speak is something called Frenglish, and I have to rely on wife to translate. Looking back, I wish I had paid more attention in french class.

People need to realise that knowing both languages opens up a whole bunch of doors for you, and this is why we send our children to an all french school. They learn english at home, and the school slowly introduces english studies at around grade 5. They will go to a half and half for high school.

So IMO instead of saying "I'm English, screw you" Or "Baisez-vous, je suis français" both should embrace each cultures and languages and reap the benifits of doing so.
If you want to give your kids the real open door. Send them to learn chinese as their second language. China will be the economic capital soon enough.
And besides that,
Im half french/Half Japanese(Though my primary is english), and I guarantee you every resume I have ever had looked over, people were more interested in if I could speak japanese than French, because "Everyone speaks french, and we need people more versatile in their languages than just french"
 

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Looking back now, my biggest regret is that I didn't pay enough attention in French classes, and didn't take them at all past grade 10. I live in Ottawa, and my weak French (to say that I can even speak franglais would be a stretch) closes a lot of doors. I'm currently working my ass off to try to become functional in the language.

As a country, we should definitely embrace bilingualism. West of Ottawa, French doesn't really come in to play in our daily lives, but we should make it a priority to help our kids learn to speak more than one language (even if it's not French), as doing so is a major asset in life. Joe's right, Chinese would be the most advantageous second language to learn ... although it's very difficult (they use different phenomes than us, and non-phonetic characters too. Yikes!).

Spanish is not an offical language, French is, Spanish speaking people were not co-founding fathers of your nation, the French were.

One third of your population does not speak Spanish living within their own distinct culture and recognized as such, the French here do.

There are huge differences between the Spanish scenario in the US and the French one in Canada.
There is a huge difference, but there are also some similarities. In some regions of the U.S., a third or more of the population does speak Spanish. Over 40% in New Mexico, over a third in California and Texas, and 28% in Arizona. In total, there are 40 million Spanish speakers in the U.S., which is more than the total population of Canada. source Strange that Spanish isn't even an official language in any of those states.

Obviously, it's still a very different situation, but I think Americans could benefit greatly from embracing Spanish just as we could benefit by embracing French.
 

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As a country, we should definitely embrace bilingualism.

Chinese would be the most advantageous second language to learn ...

In total, there are 40 million Spanish speakers in the U.S., which is more than the total population of Canada.
Couldn't agree more with your first statement.

Funnily enough there are more Chinese speaking/learning English than there are Canadians. That's so we will understand them when they politely take us over:)

40 million Spanish speaking folks un the US represents just over 10% of the population and is not the first time the US has absorbed huge alien populations. French speaking Canadians represent about a third of our populaton...everything is relative.
 

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As agonizing as French class can be at times I must say that knowing another language is useful. It shares some big similarities with many other languages making them easier to use as well. Also, for me personally, I'm part of the generation that had grammar taken out of the curriculum. I've learned it all through French.

The biggest problem associated with learning it is that English is such a screwed up language. Really, it doesn't compare well to any other language. This makes learning other languages like French more difficult.
 

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As agonizing as French class can be at times I must say that knowing another language is useful. It shares some big similarities with many other languages making them easier to use as well. Also, for me personally, I'm part of the generation that had grammar taken out of the curriculum. I've learned it all through French.

The biggest problem associated with learning it is that English is such a screwed up language. Really, it doesn't compare well to any other language. This makes learning other languages like French more difficult.

I'm just curious as to why you say English is a screwed up language and what your basis is for saying: "it doesn't compare well to any other language?"
 

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What is this "French" you guys are talking about. I thought it was messy mouth kissing. JK :haha:

Seriously, I think it's healthy the minute one opens their inner doors to other cultures. Learning French, or any other language will certainly do that. In Europe people speak more then a few languages. Not them all but you get my drift.

I am a western Canadian, I do not speak French. However, I would love to learn and my wife and I have it on our "to do" list together. I respect my French brothers and sisters.....and would appreciate if some of them remembered that some of us in the west really want to be a part of their culture. I say that as I've been attacked more then once in my travels out east for not conforming to the demands of a culture the simply "expects" me to know how to order a beer in their language.

I don't think there is a better person to learn such a romantic language with then a spouse. ;) Perhaps we'll get started tonight....:git: :)

RB
 

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What is this "French" you guys are talking about. I thought it was messy mouth kissing. JK :haha:

Seriously, I think it's healthy the minute one opens their inner doors to other cultures. Learning French, or any other language will certainly do that. In Europe people speak more then a few languages. Not them all but you get my drift.

I am a western Canadian, I do not speak French. However, I would love to learn and my wife and I have it on our "to do" list together. I respect my French brothers and sisters.....and would appreciate if some of them remembered that some of us in the west really want to be a part of their culture. I say that as I've been attacked more then once in my travels out east for not conforming to the demands of a culture the simply "expects" me to know how to order a beer in their language.

I don't think there is a better person to learn such a romantic language with then a spouse. ;) Perhaps we'll get started tonight....:git: :)

RB
I speak french fluently in both languages. :haha:

I would just like to note, if Canada wasn't Bi-lingual, than French wouldn't be a national language.
 

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I'm not Canadian, but I'm bilingual. I came to US from Korea when i was 9. It took me 2 years to learn English so I can speak fluently. I still have troubles with my grammars, and I'm 14. It is extremely difficult for one person to fully master one language while learning one. French is easier to learn when your first language is English, and vice versa, but still in my honest opinion, in Canada, bilingualism will not work, and it isn't working. According to some source, only 15% of whole populations know both languages. Thats not a lot. That means other 85% can't communicate with their own countrymen who speaks different languages.
 

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I'm not Canadian, but I'm bilingual. I came to US from Korea when i was 9. It took me 2 years to learn English so I can speak fluently. I still have troubles with my grammars, and I'm 14. It is extremely difficult for one person to fully master one language while learning one. French is easier to learn when your first language is English, and vice versa, but still in my honest opinion, in Canada, bilingualism will not work, and it isn't working. According to some source, only 15% of whole populations know both languages. Thats not a lot. That means other 85% can't communicate with their own countrymen who speaks different languages.
Interesting perspective. However - there are things to consider. I've met many English who cannot speak French. I've never met a French person in all my life and all my travels coast to coast in this country who cannot speak English.

Bilingualism is an order of Parliment. It is a political statement. That is all. I hate to say it but the truth of the matter is, since I can remember I have been forced to undertake the French language and culture. Many from my generation failed everything to do with French class. We were being forced to learn a language we wanted nothing to do with. This is where I believe much of the English resentment of French issues and points of view come from. In a country like Canada, a free country, we were simply forced to learn this language. It was a failed approch IMO and I am living proof of it.

However, that being said, please read my first post regarding the French culture. It was my travels and their history that changed my point of view. I came to appreciate the beauty of Montreal and the lifestyle. Without a doubt there are some seriously rude people out there. Hate to tell it like it is but I had to really work at getting through that. There were people there who treated me like an "English pig" all the while I was there willingly, wanting to know what it was all about.

To this day I am now completely interested in learning the language. However, I am told that French as in France French, is very different then the French that is spoken in Quebec. Can't back that up yet however I believe it has something to do with dialect.

Take care. :)

RB
 

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The point of french class is not as much to make you fluent (If you don't take it after grade 9) It really just gives You enough french that you can get by easily with. It's hard when the only things you know are how to say hello, good bye, I would like, etc.
 

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To this day I am now completely interested in learning the language. However, I am told that French as in France French, is very different then the French that is spoken in Quebec. Can't back that up yet however I believe it has something to do with dialect.

Take care. :)

RB
The France french is kinda diffrent, it's the same language, words mean the same is most cases, but it's different if you know what I mean.
 

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But I'd agree theres more we can do, for example making it mandatory to know both French and English.
IN what context?

I've never met a French person in all my life and all my travels coast to coast in this country who cannot speak English.
May I recommeened when visiting Quebec going into the interior a bit (aka not Montreal, Gatineau, or even Quebec City). I've met MANY people when visiting friends in Quebec that when I converse in English, they get the "deer-in-headlights" look on their face.

ON a side note it's a great way to get premier service since it seems most managers are bi-lingual.

As for myself I could never grasp the language, or indeed any language (I'm one of those lucky folks that barely passed english, yet aced math and science. woot), so I never picked up french even though I did it for six years in school. It's just not in my brain's wiring it seems. ANd it's jsut not with French; Spanish, German, even Gaelic...none of them stick.

Has that impended me? In a way. When I lived in Ottawa I gave up applying for anything government related because they put more emphasis on if you were bilingual then if you could do the job or had the skills. Thankfully my industry (IT), there was a large private sector in Ottawa that the opposite was true. So what does that mean for me? Well I guess I'm not good enough to be Prime Minister, but other then that it doesnt' really affect me much.

As for the whole language debate, IMO it's oen of the things that has held this country back. There's bigger and more important things to worry about then this, and should have been settled decades ago. SInce its' such a political thing now, I doubt I'll see the populace clue in to this and move on in my lifetime, but I can hope.
 

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I'm going to take French in college, so that when I move to Canada, I will not be at a disadvantage, and people wont think I'm a stupid, ignorant American.
 
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