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Whatever, everything you said was wrong and now you point out that OUTSIDE the NHL they played against each other??? Who cares, we're talking about the NHL, fights in the NHL, toughness in the NHL, being in the top of the NHL penalty leaders, all facts that are false.

Now all you come back with is he played on a different team pre-NHL? Great; now prove all your other points, 1) that Lalonde could fight and was one of the toughest, 2) that Lalonde was top 5-10 in PIMS every year , 3) that he had a rivalry with Joe Hall (ie: you suggest they fought a lot)

Until you do ANY of that you're still full of it.
 

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Whatever, everything you said was wrong and now you point out that OUTSIDE the NHL they played against each other??? Who cares, we're talking about the NHL, fights in the NHL, toughness in the NHL, being in the top of the NHL penalty leaders, all facts that are false.
Pretty sure that I'm wasting my time here, but what the hell...

The NHL and the NHA are the same league.
They share the same history.

After the 1917 season, the club owners had grown completely tired of the antics of Eddie Livingstone, owner of the Toronto Blueshirts. They decided to reorganize themselves under the guise of a new league, dissolving the Association, and "starting anew" as the National Hockey League, and placing the Blueshirts under the operation of the league itself. The NHL was the same as the NHA, minus one owner.

The rivalry I speak of occurred in the same league, with the same teams, with the same group of players, but with an "A" instead of an "L" at the end of the league's name.

Even if it was the Eastern Labrador Hockey Federation, Lalonde spent the better part of a decade involved in a bitter feud with the toughest guy in the sport.

Now all you come back with is he played on a different team pre-NHL? Great; now prove all your other points, 1) that Lalonde could fight and was one of the toughest, 2) that Lalonde was top 5-10 in PIMS every year , 3) that he had a rivalry with Joe Hall (ie: you suggest they fought a lot)
Until you do ANY of that you're still full of it.
Again, not that I think it will make the slightest difference... Not only have you been exceptionally rude about the entire subject, you've accused me of out-and-out lying on the matter. That will get dropped NOW.

1) I'll answer that after answering #3.

2) His time from 1918 and on is covered at hockeydb. Feel free to look it up, where you'd see my earlier point is correct. His time before 1918 is more difficult to piece together as immediately accessable web data is practically impossible to get at, meaning I would have to reconstruct the penalty numbers from all NHA players in a database. Obviously, I'm not doing that for the purposes of this pissing match. I can note this, though:

Lalonde's PIM numbers dropped off sharply when Joe Hall became Lalonde's teammate. Before that, when the played on opposite clubs, his PIM/GP were up there with the toughest guys like Joe Hall, Harry Mummery and Bert Corbeau. And again... Lalonde piled up more than his share of penalty minutes by fighting Joe Hall and the others.

3) I do more than suggest that Lalonde feuded with Hall.From various books, regarding their at-the-time famous feud, which sold many tickets in anticipation of the next bloodletting:

"One thing they had in common, though, was a wicked temper. And although they would end up as teammates and roommates, they were at the center of some savage battles"

"Althoughy Newsy has been remembered largely for his scoring prowess, he was one of the roughest men ever to play the game. Hall, however, was most feared."

"The story of Hall and Lalonde's personal battles is both disturbing and entertaining."

"Hall slashed Lalonde across the throat with his stick 'practically severing his windpipe,' according to the Montreal Gazette. The next time Quebec played the Canadiens, the Westmount Arena was jam-packed. This time, Hall carved Lalonde for 18 stitches before the bloodied Frenchman smashed his stick over Hall-s collarbone. Montreal bigwigs, far from being appalled, were thrilled as bloodthirsty fans were hooked on the feud."

"Hall and Lalonde were both penalized for fighting. Lalonde got the last laugh this time, leaving an eight-stitch signature across Hall's face."

"Bad Joe had the memory of an elephant. In a subsequent match... he rammed Lalonde into the side fence, cutting the Frenchman so badly that two of his mates were required to carry him off the ice."

"He [Hall] certainly staked out his territory as hockey's baddest man. His blood feud with the Montreal Canadiens' Newsy Lalonde was quite possibly the most beastly ever witnessed in the history of organized sport."

"Lalonde was the complete package: he could skate, shoot, stick handle, and pass expertly. He was also a skilled fighter with a volcanic temper. As a result, fans came out in droves to cheer him on or scream for his blood. Many of his 'bad' contemporaries - Joe Hall, Ken Randall, Cully Wilson, Sprague Cleghorn - bore long-lasting scars from their run-ins with Lalonde."

-Ultimate Hockey
"He [Hall] was a defenseman of the first rank in the early days of the game, and a good man off the ice, but he was animal at times on it. He had a long battle with Newsy Lalonde when that star was with the Canadiens and Hall was with Quebec in the NHA, but they later became teammates and friends on the Habs"

-Players, The Ultimate A to Z Guide of Everyone Who Has Ever Played in
the NHL
"Hall did constant battle with some of the toughest customers in early hockey history, including the Canadiens' Edouard "Newsy" LaLonde, ex-teammate Didier "Cannonball" Pitre, and bruising brothers Sprague and Odie Cleghorn of the Wanderers."

-Out of the Mists of the Past: Kenora Thistles
"Joe Hall, known better as 'Bad' Joe Hall, was the NHL's tough guy. In his pre-Canadien days, he had legendary battles with Newsy Lalonde, now his teammate. They were classic 'knock-em-down, drag-em-out, last man standing wins,' all to be forgotten when they were on the same team"

-The 1919 Stanley Cup Championship: The One That Wasn't
"Hall was a rough and tumble defenseman in professional hockey's early days but at times he regretted his violent outbursts, saying once that he was 'giving a dog a bad name.' He played with the Stanley Cup champion Quebec Bulldogs during the 1911-12 and 1912-13 seasons and had developed a nasty feud with the Montreal Canadiens star forward Newsy Lalonde since the early days of the National Hockey Association."

-Legends of Hockey, HHOF
Honestly... I wouldn't have said Lalonde was tough and had a feud with Hall unless I had read it any number of times. Now, if you take issue with these quotes, I invite you to write letters to each of the authors of the above works, and point out what idiots they are. Make note of the fact that they've just made up facts, have no credibility, and are full of it. Maybe you could question how anybody could even publish such lies?

Do that and get back to me. Until then, please accept that Lalonde was considered to a skilled and willing fighter, because that is where all of this began: your issue with me referring to Lalonde as one of the toughest and most skilled fighters in the league.

Actually, I'd really like to see you tell the Hockey Hall of Fame just how wrong they have it. Fill me in when you correct this outrage.

Daryl
 

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Your wasting your time Daryl some people choose to ignore the facts and blindly argue .

Although in his defense it may be a comprehension problem.;)
 

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LOL...

Dave Tomlinson was on Team 1040 yesterday, and he had a great point. After he left the NHL, he played in Sweden for a while. He said that when fighting was banned, the stickwork was so bad the North American players were shocked. But when the league allowed fighting for a season, the stickwork virtually disappeared.

Now there will always be exceptions to every rule or trend. But I think back in the 50s, 60s and 70s, guys had to be more accountable themselves. If you cheapshotted someone, you had to answer the bell personally, no matter who you were...it wasn't until Gretzky came along that the role of the enforcer, as it is defined today, was truly established. Until then the stars of the day were just as capable of throwing down with the toughest guys in the league as anyone else.
 

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“it wasn't until Gretzky came along that the role of the enforcer, as it is defined today, was truly established”
You’re suffering from “recency”. Why do you think Montreal traded for John Ferguson? Why was there arole for Reg Fleming, Howie Young , yadda, yadda. Hockey badguys are not a new phenomenon.
 
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