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If there was a case of a hockey player living and dieing by the sword and almost dying by the sword it occured in the 1969 preseason.

Ted Green , a Boston Bruins defenseman who was amongst the most fearsome players in the league throughout the 1960's.

In an exhibition game in 1969 versus St Louis. Blues forward Wayne Maki charged Green from behind the Boston net. Green then reach out and gave Maki a love tap with his glove. Maki fell to the ice but still managed to spear Green in the stomach. Green then counter attacked with a stick swipe that caught Maki below the shoulder. As green skated away Maki swung his stick clipping Green in the head with his stick. Green hit the ice hard. With Green's life indanger he had suffered a skull fracture and a 2 1/2 hour operation was recquired. Green didn't die but came out of it with temporary paralysis.

Meanwhile both players were charged with assauls with attempt to injure. Eventually each was acquitted. Maki suspended for 30 days and Green suspended for 13 games.



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Just goes to show how brutal times were back in the 60's and 70's.
 

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When Bobby arrived in Boston, the leader in the locker room was Ted Green.
In a game versus St. Louis, early in Orr's career, the infamous pole-axing
of Ted Green took place. A rookie forward named Wayne Maki took his stick
to Green's head. As Green lay motionless on the ice, Bobby Orr flew over
the boards and pummeled Maki to the ice. Orr then turned to his teammate,
where he quickly realized that something was seriously wrong. Green's
life was in danger after being diagnosised with a fractured skull, a blood
clot, and partial paralysis. Green recovered and returned to the Bruins,
but was never the same player. The Bruins needed a new leader and they
soon realized it would be #4.
 

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The title of this thread should read "Ted Green nearly died after stick swinging incident with Maki."

Maki, BTW, did die when he suffered a brain hemoredge on the ice sometime after this incident.
 

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If it wasn't for that damned instigator rule, then this would never happened!

Oh, wait...

Daryl
LOL...

Dave Tomlinson was on Team 1040 yesterday, and he had a great point. After he left the NHL, he played in Sweden for a while. He said that when fighting was banned, the stickwork was so bad the North American players were shocked. But when the league allowed fighting for a season, the stickwork virtually disappeared.

Now there will always be exceptions to every rule or trend. But I think back in the 50s, 60s and 70s, guys had to be more accountable themselves. If you cheapshotted someone, you had to answer the bell personally, no matter who you were...it wasn't until Gretzky came along that the role of the enforcer, as it is defined today, was truly established. Until then the stars of the day were just as capable of throwing down with the toughest guys in the league as anyone else.
 

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LOL...

Dave Tomlinson was on Team 1040 yesterday, and he had a great point. After he left the NHL, he played in Sweden for a while. He said that when fighting was banned, the stickwork was so bad the North American players were shocked. But when the league allowed fighting for a season, the stickwork virtually disappeared.

Now there will always be exceptions to every rule or trend. But I think back in the 50s, 60s and 70s, guys had to be more accountable themselves. If you cheapshotted someone, you had to answer the bell personally, no matter who you were...it wasn't until Gretzky came along that the role of the enforcer, as it is defined today, was truly established. Until then the stars of the day were just as capable of throwing down with the toughest guys in the league as anyone else.
Hell, even from the late 1800s on up, guys were pretty accountable. Any number of the greatest stars were among the toughest fighters in the league: Frank Patrick, Sprague Cleghorn, Newsy Lalonde, etc, etc, etc.

However, there have ALWAYS been players that benefitted from having an enforcer who did the fighting for them, long long before Wayne Gretzky was a gleam in his great-grandfather's eye. The practice has gone through periods of heavier and lighter use, but it's always been a tactic.

It's easy to imagine the stick work increasing, as in Tomlinson's account: I can believe that.

Daryl
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Newsy Lalonde a fighter? I never new that!

I can see what Tomlinson means though. Without the fighting it resulted in stick swinging incidents in which we are trying to eliminate from are game today.

This incident was brutal. They should had just dropped the mits. I know when I read this I was thinking what were they doing? They could easily just fight. What made it even worse was they weren't wearing helmets back then so the stick to the side of the head is harsh.
 

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Ya, Sergei Zholtok died in a game in Latvia in 2004. He became ill at the end of the game and died later in hospital with cardiac arrhythmia. Bill Masterton, from which we get the Bill Masterton Trophy, died from a hit in a game in 1968. Someone who didn't get killed but came far to close was Clint Malarchuk when a skate slit his neck and he cut his juggler.
 

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If there was a case of a hockey player living and dieing by the sword and almost dying by the sword it occured in the 1969 preseason.

Ted Green , a Boston Bruins defenseman who was amongst the most fearsome players in the league throughout the 1960's.

In an exhibition game in 1969 versus St Louis. Blues forward Wayne Maki charged Green from behind the Boston net. Green then reach out and gave Maki a love tap with his glove. Maki fell to the ice but still managed to spear Green in the stomach. Green then counter attacked with a stick swipe that caught Maki below the shoulder. As green skated away Maki swung his stick clipping Green in the head with his stick. Green hit the ice hard. With Green's life indanger he had suffered a skull fracture and a 2 1/2 hour operation was recquired. Green didn't die but came out of it with temporary paralysis.

Meanwhile both players were charged with assauls with attempt to injure. Eventually each was acquitted. Maki suspended for 30 days and Green suspended for 13 games.



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Just goes to show how brutal times were back in the 60's and 70's.


I remember Ted Green.

He didn't give love taps to anyone.

He was one of the dirtiest players that ever played.

I don't think that I was too upset when this happened to him.

Before this, Wayne Maki's claim to fame was being Chico Maki's brother.
 

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Newsy Lalonde averaged 27 minutes in penalties per year for his NHL career, that's not indicative of him being, "... among the toughest fighters in the league..."
 

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Newsy Lalonde averaged 27 minutes in penalties per year for his NHL career, that's not indicative of him being, "... among the toughest fighters in the league..."
And that was enough to put him in the top 5 or 10 in PIM damn near every year that he played. Was considered to be a skilled fighter, and had a years-long feud with Joe Hall.

Nobody, but nobody, would carry on a feud with Hall unless he was as tough as they come.

Daryl
 

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And that was enough to put him in the top 5 or 10 in PIM damn near every year that he played. Was considered to be a skilled fighter, and had a years-long feud with Joe Hall.

Nobody, but nobody, would carry on a feud with Hall unless he was as tough as they come.

Daryl
I realize you're a moderator and all but let's not just make up facts. Here's the real deal....

Lalonde started his career at the inception of the NHL for his first 2 seasons there was ONLY 3 teams with about 8 full time players per team (i.e. players that played double digit amounts of games in a schedule that varied from 18-24 games over those years.

Being in "the top 10" in minutes in a league with 30 guys is like being 240th in minutes in today's NHL, big deal, you ain't tough. (lol, 240th this year was Markus Naslund)

Lalonde only played for 5 seasons. In year one he was 13th in PIM out of 24 players. He went on to finish 5th in year 2, 10th in year 3, 9th in year 4 and 16th in year 5, never close to the team leaders.

Lalonde was on the SAME team as Joe Hall and NEVER played an NHL game against him so they never fought in an NHL game!!! Hall and Lalonde's NHL careers only overlapped in 1917-1919 (Hall becoming an answer to a famous trivia question when he died of influenza and the Championships being cancelled subsequently) while playing together in Montreal Hall out-minuting Lalonde 145 to 52 over that span.

Let's get real, there's no factual data to support Lalonde's fighting ability, nor any data indicating how many majors he received in a career that lasted only 99 games.

Quite frankly, even if you COULD produce any stats to support your assertions, you've lost all credibility with your comment about a famous rivalry with Hall, HIS TEAMMATE!!

:deadhorse:
 

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I realize you're a moderator and all but let's not just make up facts. Here's the real deal....

Lalonde started his career at the inception of the NHL for his first 2 seasons there was ONLY 3 teams with about 8 full time players per team (i.e. players that played double digit amounts of games in a schedule that varied from 18-24 games over those years.

Being in "the top 10" in minutes in a league with 30 guys is like being 240th in minutes in today's NHL, big deal, you ain't tough. (lol, 240th this year was Markus Naslund)

Lalonde only played for 5 seasons. In year one he was 13th in PIM out of 24 players. He went on to finish 5th in year 2, 10th in year 3, 9th in year 4 and 16th in year 5, never close to the team leaders.

Lalonde was on the SAME team as Joe Hall and NEVER played an NHL game against him so they never fought in an NHL game!!! Hall and Lalonde's NHL careers only overlapped in 1917-1919 (Hall becoming an answer to a famous trivia question when he died of influenza and the Championships being cancelled subsequently) while playing together in Montreal Hall out-minuting Lalonde 145 to 52 over that span.

Let's get real, there's no factual data to support Lalonde's fighting ability, nor any data indicating how many majors he received in a career that lasted only 99 games.

Quite frankly, even if you COULD produce any stats to support your assertions, you've lost all credibility with your comment about a famous rivalry with Hall, HIS TEAMMATE!!
Care of the Hockey Hall of Fame:

Joe Hall career stats:
http://www.legendsofhockey.net:8080/LegendsOfHockey/jsp/LegendsMember.jsp?mem=p196105&type=Player&page=statsawards&list=#photo

Newsy Lalonde career stats:
http://www.legendsofhockey.net:8080/LegendsOfHockey/jsp/LegendsMember.jsp?mem=p196105&type=Player&page=statsawards&list=#photo

On those pages, you will note that Hall played for the Quebec Bulldogs from 1910 until the 1917-18 season.

You will also note on Lalonde's page that he played for the Habs from 1910 thru the 1918 season (except for 1912) when he all and Hall were teammates.

I'll say it succintly and loudly, given the rude and obnoxious tone in your post, not to mention your desire for credibility:

HALL AND LALONDE PLAYED FOR RIVAL TEAMS FOR 9 F'ING YEARS UNTIL THEY BECAME TEAMMATES IN 1918.

You'll see, on Lalonde's page, that he had a number of seasons in which he piled up a large number of penalties. These were quite often penalties he accumulated in wars with guys like Joe Hall, one of the toughest couple of guys in the league at the time. If Lalonde wasn't tough, what was he doing constantly fighting a guy like that?

Daryl
 
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