Hockey Fan Forums banner

21 - 40 of 52 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,679 Posts
Ummm he did take them to game 7 of the cup final, and if he they did win he would have been the clear Conn Smythe winner.

I would say yes he did win with the Oilers.
But they lost game 7. How can you call it a win?

Your using the word IF. Heck IF Drury didnt score with 7.5 seconds vs the rangers the rangers would have been up 3-2 in the second round last season. And IF that happen it may of crished the sabres hope. So many IF's

The ducks team was much more loaded then the oilers team so of course pronger had a better supporting cast there meaning he was out shawdowed by others.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,798 Posts
The Oilers did get hosed in that Pronger deal. I really wonder why Lowe made such a dumb trade. He traded away one of the top three defensemen in the league for two nobodies. Maybe if he got Getzlaf or Perry in that deal, he wouldn't look so dumb. However Lupul and Smid were definite **** kickers last year and Lowe got hosed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,046 Posts
But they lost game 7. How can you call it a win?

Your using the word IF. Heck IF Drury didnt score with 7.5 seconds vs the rangers the rangers would have been up 3-2 in the second round last season. And IF that happen it may of crished the sabres hope. So many IF's

The ducks team was much more loaded then the oilers team so of course pronger had a better supporting cast there meaning he was out shawdowed by others.
The fact remains that Pronger carried the 8th or 7th seed, I can't remember, Oilers to game 7 of the Stanley Cup Finals. It was a remarkable feat and Pronger was incredible during the run. Then he gets traded to Anahiem and they basically steamroll through the playoffs for a Cup victory. Only the Wings really challenged the Ducks. Unless Ladislav Smid turns into a HOF defenseman for the Oil, this was a runaway victory of a trade for the Ducks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,679 Posts
The fact remains that Pronger carried the 8th or 7th seed, I can't remember, Oilers to game 7 of the Stanley Cup Finals. It was a remarkable feat and Pronger was incredible during the run. Then he gets traded to Anahiem and they basically steamroll through the playoffs for a Cup victory. Only the Wings really challenged the Ducks. Unless Ladislav Smid turns into a HOF defenseman for the Oil, this was a runaway victory of a trade for the Ducks.
Im not arguing that it wasnt a great trade for the ducks in fact it was. if you see my quote below i made a mention there was a guy named nieds also on the ducks. that enitire team was pretty well stacked. I guess what it all comes down to is winning more then being lopsided. there's been many lopsided trades in the past but the ones really worth a mention are the ones were the players single handed made there team a champion.

And did pronger win for the oilers?

I would say pronger helped the Ducks but being #2 behind nieds prob helped the ducks more then being the #1 on the oilers.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,541 Posts
Im not arguing that it wasnt a great trade for the ducks in fact it was. if you see my quote below i made a mention there was a guy named nieds also on the ducks. that enitire team was pretty well stacked. I guess what it all comes down to is winning more then being lopsided. there's been many lopsided trades in the past but the ones really worth a mention are the ones were the players single handed made there team a champion.
well pronger did school that stacked ducks team, playing witht he thin Oiler's line up
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,046 Posts
Im not arguing that it wasnt a great trade for the ducks in fact it was. if you see my quote below i made a mention there was a guy named nieds also on the ducks. that enitire team was pretty well stacked. I guess what it all comes down to is winning more then being lopsided. there's been many lopsided trades in the past but the ones really worth a mention are the ones were the players single handed made there team a champion.
Did the Ducks win the year before acquiring Pronger? No. They were actually beaten by the Oilers as MaCabe mentioned. Pronger got traded to the Ducks, and I can't really think of any other big acquisitions they made but then they won the Cup. I'm not saying he did it single-handedly, but Pronger sure as hell was a large part of the Ducks' success.

Also, your rationale for lopsided trades is wrong, otherwise the Lindros trade wouldn't be a lopsided trade. None of the players that left Philly made the Avs a contender single-handedly, but altogether they combined to create a dynasty, with of course the acquisition of Roy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,679 Posts
well pronger did school that stacked ducks team, playing witht he thin Oiler's line up
Well consider a few players on the ducks came into there own only last season. Getzlaf and Penner. Temmu getting older and in the finals giving his all last gas more then probabal. many things went right.

I dont think that ducks teams you mentioned was as stacked as last years turned out to be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,795 Posts
Why should "single handidly leading" your team to winning the cup be a factor of a lopsided trade?

No chance in hell that Anaheim would've had the season they had had they not aqquired Pronger, no way would they have finished second in the west, and won the Stanley Cup. Just knowing that the prescence and belonging of Pronger being part of your team is a huge morale boost.

Pronger was looking like a run-away Norris trophy winner before he got hurt during the season, and played some tough, greasey hockey that struck fear into his opponents whenever he touched the ice.

Many say that the Gretzky trade to L.A was one of the most lopsided trades ever. But Gretzky never led L.A to the Stanley Cup. So was it just a very good trade on L.A's part?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,679 Posts
Did the Ducks win the year before acquiring Pronger? No. They were actually beaten by the Oilers as MaCabe mentioned. Pronger got traded to the Ducks, and I can't really think of any other big acquisitions they made but then they won the Cup. I'm not saying he did it single-handedly, but Pronger sure as hell was a large part of the Ducks' success.

Also, your rationale for lopsided trades is wrong, otherwise the Lindros trade wouldn't be a lopsided trade. None of the players that left Philly made the Avs a contender single-handedly, but altogether they combined to create a dynasty, with of course the acquisition of Roy.

Kind of what im getting at.

As for the year before as my last post before this one a few players had breakout years or came into there own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,679 Posts
Why should "single handidly leading" your team to winning the cup be a factor of a lopsided trade?

No chance in hell that Anaheim would've had the season they had had they not aqquired Pronger, no way would they have finished second in the west, and won the Stanley Cup. Just knowing that the prescence and belonging of Pronger being part of your team is a huge morale boost.

Pronger was looking like a run-away Norris trophy winner before he got hurt during the season, and played some tough, greasey hockey that struck fear into his opponents whenever he touched the ice.

Many say that the Gretzky trade to L.A was one of the most lopsided trades ever. But Gretzky never led L.A to the Stanley Cup. So was it just a very good trade on L.A's part?
It was good that it brought interest into western hockey. so it was good. as for lopsided i cant say that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
987 Posts
A couple of nobodies to Boston for Ken Dryden (ouch)

Cliff Ronning,Geoff Courtnall,Sergio Momesso,Robert Dirk,5th round pick to Vancouver for Garth Butcher and Dan Quinn

Jeff Brown,Bret Hedican,Nathan Lafayette to Vancouver for Craig Janney- say what you want about Brown, and admittedly he had some off ice problems, but the 94 run would not have existed without this trade, meanwhile Janney bounced around the league and never regained his form.
It's pretty hard to claim one of the most lopsided trades in NHL history when there's barely an all-star in there let alone a hall of famer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
295 Posts
Discussion Starter #34
Why should "single handidly leading" your team to winning the cup be a factor of a lopsided trade?

No chance in hell that Anaheim would've had the season they had had they not aqquired Pronger, no way would they have finished second in the west, and won the Stanley Cup. Just knowing that the prescence and belonging of Pronger being part of your team is a huge morale boost.

Pronger was looking like a run-away Norris trophy winner before he got hurt during the season, and played some tough, greasey hockey that struck fear into his opponents whenever he touched the ice.

Many say that the Gretzky trade to L.A was one of the most lopsided trades ever. But Gretzky never led L.A to the Stanley Cup. So was it just a very good trade on L.A's part?
It doesn't PROVE that it was a lopsided trade, it just gauges the value of the player being traded. Add that with all other things being exchanged, and then reconsider whether it was a lopsided trade or not. :hky1:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,442 Posts
a lopsided trade is where one team gets much less than it gets back while the other team gets a lot more than it lost.

i've been following hockey since the late '80s and the roy deal is the most lopsided trade i've seen. montreal lost its franchise player and has won just three playoff series since. and how colorado did from 1996 until the day roy retired speaks for itself.

but here's another one: petr klima, adam graves, and joe murphy for jimmy carson. the oilers traded gretzky after winning their fourth cup in five years and the very next year lost to gretzky's kings in the first round. then they traded carson, the principle in the gretzky deal and coming off a 49 goal 100 point season, to detroit for three highly regarded young scorers. that year, murphy and graves teamed up with margin gelinas to form the kid line that helped the oilers win their last stanley cup. klima scored a memorable OT goal that year and became a 25-40 goal scorer for edmonton over the next four years, leading the team in scoring once. murphy also eventually led the oilers in scoring before being traded to chicago. graves, the best of the bunch, was signed by the rangers as a restricted free agent. the oilers were awarded troy mallette in probably the most lopsided free agent compensations in NHL history. carson, on the other hand, never came close to fifty goals or 100 points ever again. he had a four decent seasons in detroit before moving on, but was never better than any, let alone all three, of the players he was traded for. in the late '80s, the red wings were a talented young team on the cusp. they'd made the playoffs the three previous years and won two rounds before the trade. the year of the trade, when the oilers won the cup, detroit finished third last. detroit won their division in '92 with a new crop of young stars like fedorov, lidstrom, and konstantinov. imagine how much sooner detroit would have made the finals if they hadn't traded an entire scoring line for a 20 goal scorer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
759 Posts
Someof you forgot the genious of Sam Pollock, 2 trades that come in mind:
1) Montreal trades Guy Allen and Paul Reid for Boston's Ken Dryden
2) The Habs' astute General Manager, Sam Pollock, was keen to find a way to trade with the California Golden Seals to obtain their first round draft pick. He persuaded Seals owner Charlie Finley to trade the Seals' pick and Francois Lacombe in return for Montreal's first round pick and a veteran Ernie Hicke. He hesitated between Lafleur and Marcel Dionne, but chose Lafleur with his overall no.1 pick. It turned out to be one of the most lopsided deals in NHL history.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,403 Posts
Someof you forgot the genious of Sam Pollock, 2 trades that come in mind:
1) Montreal trades Guy Allen and Paul Reid for Boston's Ken Dryden
2) The Habs' astute General Manager, Sam Pollock, was keen to find a way to trade with the California Golden Seals to obtain their first round draft pick. He persuaded Seals owner Charlie Finley to trade the Seals' pick and Francois Lacombe in return for Montreal's first round pick and a veteran Ernie Hicke. He hesitated between Lafleur and Marcel Dionne, but chose Lafleur with his overall no.1 pick. It turned out to be one of the most lopsided deals in NHL history.
And when it appeared that Oakland would not be the last place team in 1971, he traded Ralph Backstrom to the Kings, which meant the Kings fortunes improved enough to finish second last and thus preserving the #1 pick that Pollock had coveted and used to select Lafleur.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
295 Posts
Discussion Starter #40
a lopsided trade is where one team gets much less than it gets back while the other team gets a lot more than it lost.

i've been following hockey since the late '80s and the roy deal is the most lopsided trade i've seen. montreal lost its franchise player and has won just three playoff series since. and how colorado did from 1996 until the day roy retired speaks for itself.

but here's another one: petr klima, adam graves, and joe murphy for jimmy carson. the oilers traded gretzky after winning their fourth cup in five years and the very next year lost to gretzky's kings in the first round. then they traded carson, the principle in the gretzky deal and coming off a 49 goal 100 point season, to detroit for three highly regarded young scorers. that year, murphy and graves teamed up with margin gelinas to form the kid line that helped the oilers win their last stanley cup. klima scored a memorable OT goal that year and became a 25-40 goal scorer for edmonton over the next four years, leading the team in scoring once. murphy also eventually led the oilers in scoring before being traded to chicago. graves, the best of the bunch, was signed by the rangers as a restricted free agent. the oilers were awarded troy mallette in probably the most lopsided free agent compensations in NHL history. carson, on the other hand, never came close to fifty goals or 100 points ever again. he had a four decent seasons in detroit before moving on, but was never better than any, let alone all three, of the players he was traded for. in the late '80s, the red wings were a talented young team on the cusp. they'd made the playoffs the three previous years and won two rounds before the trade. the year of the trade, when the oilers won the cup, detroit finished third last. detroit won their division in '92 with a new crop of young stars like fedorov, lidstrom, and konstantinov. imagine how much sooner detroit would have made the finals if they hadn't traded an entire scoring line for a 20 goal scorer.
Edmonton Oilers traded Doug Weight and Michel Riesen to the St. Louis Blues for Marty Reasoner, Jochen Hecht and Jan Horacek.
 
21 - 40 of 52 Posts
Top