Hockey Fan Forums banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Boston Bruins
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Be gentle with me.

I am born and bred in Australia, but spent some time working in Zurich where I got my first taste of Ice Hockey by going to watch the Zurich Lions play - loved it.

Then when I went to work in Boston - went to watch the Bruins play a few times - again - brilliant!!

But back here in Australia, there's not much chance to watch Ice Hockey live. So I am a fan of Ice Hockey - but know very little about it - so here is the question.

There is almost never any news about the NHL here in Australia - I would guess that over 90% of the population would not even know what the NHL is - you can catch the occasional game on Foxtel (cable TV), but that's it. 99% of Aussies would not know the playoffs are on at the moment.

However, this week there is a big news story here in Australia about Mark Scheifele's Hit on Jake Evans - its all over the news.

Lots of quotes from prominent American NHL Players saying "What is Mark Scheifele thinking there. Geez.", "It's disgusting", "Sickening", etc, I'm sure you've seen lots more over there.

So, remembering I don't know the rules so well....my question.

What was so wrong with the hit?

Sure, Evans got flattened, knocked unconscious - but Hockey is a tough game - I have seen lots of blokes get flattened, and I have seen lots of incredibly brutal hits - to me (the novice) this hit didn't seem all that different to a lot I've seen before. He didn't seems to get him with his stick, he didn't seem to sneak up on him from behind, it just looked like two Hockey Players colliding at high speed.

For example - some blokes get absolutely annihilated up against the boards, but people say they are great hits.

I've seen guys get creamed on the ice, huge hits, but again, they are said to be great hits.

He seems to lead with his arms, but again I've seen that before - is there some rule that says you can only bump (??flatten) other players with your shoulders rather than your arms??

What makes this one so different?

Was it the fact that he had just scored the goal and so the play was essentially finished - meaning he flattened him out of play or something?

I'm not trying to start a fight between Jets and Canadiens fans - I genuinely don't know why that one hit has angered so many people.

Obviously I don't know what I'm talking about Hockey wise, but I'm trying to learn.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
15 Posts
This one was tough because hits can shake up a player but they rarely leave them unconscious for significant periods of time or require being taken off the ice on a stretcher.

imho it was not, as they say, a "hockey play." The hit came well after the puck was in the net (so Scheifele was not attempting to prevent the goal) and Scheifele had plenty of time/room to avoid hitting Evans in the first place or lessening the blow. From the replays I saw it didn't look like he made any attempt to slow down. Evans never saw it coming (okay; that's on him though you would not expect to get decked after scoring a ENG) and it looked to me like he got hit face first.

It was a bad hit and I've seen some Canadiens fans' different views of it but, sorry, I've watched hockey for 40 years and that hit was avoidable and should have been.

Other opinions here, of course, are welcome to be expressed.
 

·
Registered
Boston Bruins
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your reply.

Your comment about him getting hit "face first" might be the crux of the matter.

I wondered if that was what the fuss was all about - I assume even in Hockey hitting face first is probably a bit of a no-no.

It wasn't entirely clear from the video, but given his complete Loss of Consciousness, and the length of time he was unconscious for - there must have been significant head contact.

I reread my initial post, and it may seems like I am defending the hit - but I'm not saying it was a good hit or a bad hit - i am really just saying I don't know what makes this any different than many others I've seen. Perhaps a lot of the other brutal hits I've seen are just as much fowl play as this hit, but they don't get pulled up/penalised because the victim of the hit doesn't get knocked unconscious.

I dunno.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
15 Posts
Well, at least as I saw it, Scheifele led high, and, no, hitting the head first is a no-no. However, the way Evans got thrown around, it's possible that head contact with the ice knocked him out.

Perhaps a lot of the other brutal hits I've seen are just as much fowl play as this hit, but they don't get pulled up/penalised because the victim of the hit doesn't get knocked unconscious.
It is so much a judgment call. It appears that Scheifele was only coasting when he hit Evans, so, in that sense, a penalty for charging should not have applied. On the other hand, most hockey players I know or have seen would consider the "hockey play" to be a stick check to try to keep the puck out of the net. Scheifele's stick went nowhere. Scheifele also did not appear to turn away from Evans when it became apparent contact would happen. I've seen fans state that Evans should have been aware of another player nearby and kept his head up.

Tough to say. So much of what goes into calling a penalty (and its severity) is based on apparent intent. Hockey players have knocked other players into the glass since forever. But if the victim (?) doesn't see the hit coming or when contact is made with the glass/boards face or head first or when the penalized players takes a run from a distance to hit the victim, the call is different. When a slashing or high-stick penalty is called, it's usually a two minute penalty -- unless the contact drew blood from the victim, in which case it's usually called for four minute. Different call based on severity.

There's also the issue that referees tend to call playoff games less critically than they do regular season games. "Let them play," assuming that teams will even out the justice and not wanting to cause teams to lose games because of penalties. But it's tough for players to know where the boundaries are then -- a crosscheck that would get called in November or December goes uncalled, so, of course it happens -- until someone is injured by the crosscheck, and then it gets called. Lots of people wish the refs would just call by the book -- players would figure that out and adapt. So will us fans.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top