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So basically it was Asham for Guerin? I'll take that. I'm thinking Guerin makes the team and plays on the third line, so with Betts out in the beginning of the season the fourth line will look like this?

Carcillo/Shelley-Powe-Laperriere
 

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I'm liking this. Guerin should be a great addition to the team. I'm really hoping he makes the team and gets some time in front of the crease on the PP.

http://www.csnphilly.com/09/13/10/Guerin-Accepts-Tryout-Contract-With-Flye/landing_flyers.html?blockID=310074&feedID=695
That's kinda the role the Pens wanted him to play...in front of the net. It didn't really work out.

I'm curious as to what he's willing to accept from the Flyers. Seeing as they only have about 800k, I'd then be curious as to how the Penguins wouldn't want his services for only that amount? Eh.
 

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HF-MOTM Winner - Apr 08
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Discussion Starter #24
That's kinda the role the Pens wanted him to play...in front of the net. It didn't really work out.

I'm curious as to what he's willing to accept from the Flyers. Seeing as they only have about 800k, I'd then be curious as to how the Penguins wouldn't want his services for only that amount? Eh.
Guerin for $800,000 vs Asham for $700,000...I'll take Guerin. I really liked the player Asham became in Philly and was disappointed when he wasn't resigned considering the amount of money spent on Carcillo and Shelley.

Guerin doesn't have a lot of options left...he's not going to Russia, he's said it's his last year, and there are only a couple teams left who have money or roster spots available to compete for. I'm pretty sure he's capable of making the roster over a guy like Carcillo or Shelley, no need to dress both when Guerin could be in the lineup. If he doesn't make the roster, I wouldn't be surprised to see him retire.

Maybe Pronger plays in front on the PP and Guerin takes a point spot, but probably not if Richards is already back there.

This is just one more thing that really irks me about the Shelley signing and the money Carcillo was given. Would have been nice to know Guerin wasn't being offered a contract by the Pens, say, in July. I think I would have preferred Asham and Guerin over Carcillo and Shelley, or keep Carcillo and never think about Shelley.
 

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HF-MOTM Winner - Apr 08
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Discussion Starter #25
Numbers switch
Nikolai Zherdev and Mike Richards are still not in camp. Interesting that Zherdev has already lost his No. 9 jersey to Bill Guerin, who is here on a tryout. Low numbers often indicate a player’s likelihood of being on the roster.

Zherdev was assigned Petr Nedved’s old No. 93. Zherdev’s locker was moved beside Michael Leighton, while Guerin was assigned his stall near Jeff Carter. Guerin didn’t have a stall last week. Zherdev did, and now it’s been moved. Again, interesting tidbits for a player on a tryout contract. You can book it: Guerin will make this team and force a roster move.
http://www.csnphilly.com/09/14/10/Can-Bobrovsky-Make-This-Years-Flyers-Ros/landing_flyers.html?blockID=310600&feedID=695

Very interesting observations about Bill Guerin.
 

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I'm really excited about Guerin. Definitely brings more offense to the table then our other options. Now we just have to see what the roster move will be. Also good to hear about Bobrovsky. I'm guessing he will start for the Phantoms, rather have him playing instead of being the backup and sitting on the bench.
 

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Is Bobrovsky the Flyers Future Goaltender?
Little was known about Sergei Bobrovsky before he signed an entry-level contract with the Philadelphia Flyers last May. But with the right approach, he may very well be the goaltender the Flyers have been trying to develop since, well, Ron Hextall.

Bobrovsky, 22, came to North America after playing out his five-year professional contract with Metallurg from the Russian city of Novokuznetsk. His 2.72 goals against average and .919 save percentage with Metallurg are solid indicators that he’s the real deal.

“I came to North America to play for the Flyers, not in the AHL,” the Russian goaltender said. “I must do everything I can to make the team. There is always a chance.

“I just have to work on improving every day. I need to analyze my game, make corrections accordingly. I am sure I will get my chance. If the coach decides I should spend some time in the AHL, of course I am fine with it. But I take every day as it comes and try not to think too far ahead.”

Bobrovsky started playing hockey when he was seven years old, after seeing an advertisement for a hockey school. But he wasn’t always a goaltender.

“Since I was a kid my body was very flexible. It was always very easy for me to stretch,” Bobrovsky said Thursday in Arlington, Va., after a game against the Washington Capitals’ rookies.

That flexibility was put on display during one moment in the second period, when Bobrovsky did a full split to deny a goal.

“Our Russian junior coach saw how flexible I was and one day, when all of our goalies got sick, I was asked to play in goal,” he recalled. “I was really excited about it because I always liked the goalie gear. We won that game when I was in goal for the first time. And that was it for me, I became a goaltender.”

Bobrovsky had to overcome a lot to get where he is today. It wasn’t easy, considering that he had not worked with a goaltending coach for about two years before arriving in Philadelphia.

“I have only had two goaltending coaches in my career, and in the last few years I worked out alone,” Bobrovsky said. “Of course, it slowed down my progress considerably.

“I didn’t have a person to look at me and my game from the sidelines, to analyze it and to tell me what I was doing wrong, what I had to work on. I had to resort to watching game videos by myself, study them. I was able to make progress, but it just took longer than it could have for me to understand what I had to do and how.”

Bobrovsky said the only coaching he had, was when he visited a two-week goalie camp held by a Finnish goaltending coach that another Russian, the Capitals’ Semyon Varlamov, also worked with.

If Bobrovsky could achieve so much on his own, how good could he really become in the NHL when he is provided with an opportunity to learn?

“There is a great goalie coach here in Philadelphia, Bobrovsky said. “We speak a lot, he helps me so much. It is so nice to have a goalie coach to work with me.”

Until the game against the Capitals’ prospects on Thursday, Bobrovsky had not played a game since last April, and it showed – it took him some time to settle down after a nervous first period.

“It’s the first time I played this kind of hockey and I really liked it. I especially liked lots of shots, the intensity,” Bobrovsky said of his first game in North America. “The atmosphere was amazing. I just can’t describe it. It’s on a very emotional lever, on a subconscious level. I love this atmosphere.”

Bobrovsky still has to work on his rebound control and other elements of his game considering the number of shots NHL goaltenders face.

Another important factor is his physical conditioning. Playing in the KHL on bigger rinks, Bobrovsky was playing a slower game with little lateral movement. He will have to work on his physical conditioning to avoid a common injury for European goaltenders when making a switch to the North American style – a groin injury. Spending some time in the AHL should help Bobrovsky to adapt to NHL-style hockey, although the goaltender is convinced he has a chance to play in the NHL for the Flyers as early as the start of the season.
Read the rest of the article here: http://www.csnphilly.com/09/17/10/Is-Bobrovsky-the-Flyers-Future-Goaltende/landing.html?blockID=312860&feedID=704

Seems like he really wants to get to the NHL as soon as possible, which is good. I'm hoping he is worth all the hype I keep reading about.
 
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